Ceci n’est pas une streetcar
1906 Williamsburg Bridge Plaza
Phantom Philadelphia Phantom Philadelphia Phantom Philadelphia Phantom Philadelphia
From architecture after the street:

Past Future Cities
From architecture after the street:

Past Future Cities
Spanish artists Patricia Gómez and Maria Jesus González use freso removal techniques developed for art preservation to make life-sized prints of crumbling architectural interiors. Spanish artists Patricia Gómez and Maria Jesus González use freso removal techniques developed for art preservation to make life-sized prints of crumbling architectural interiors.
A history of capturing the motion of the fight from  experiments in motion:
Egyptian burial chamber mural, (2000 BC)
Hokusai, ‘Manga’ (1815) ,
Eadweard Muybridge, ‘Wrestling Plate’ (1885) , A history of capturing the motion of the fight from  experiments in motion:
Egyptian burial chamber mural, (2000 BC)
Hokusai, ‘Manga’ (1815) ,
Eadweard Muybridge, ‘Wrestling Plate’ (1885) , A history of capturing the motion of the fight from  experiments in motion:
Egyptian burial chamber mural, (2000 BC)
Hokusai, ‘Manga’ (1815) ,
Eadweard Muybridge, ‘Wrestling Plate’ (1885) ,
From experimentsinmotion:


The digital stroboscopic image of a dancer above and the still from the video “Seaweed” by Tell No One both capture individual stages of movement in a single frame. Andy Warhol’s ‘Dance Diagram Series’ (1962) and the ‘Treatise On Quadrille Dancing’ (1819) notate the same complexity in a format that begins to approach something an architect might understand. Capturing the dance of car circulation, Kahn’s Traffic Study for Philadelphia could just as easily orchestrate a massive urban scaled ballet.

Tell No One’s video Seaweed above layers and partially freezes simple movements to create a moving sculpture that is both a structure and a dance.
Jordan Clark’s lo-fi experimental video on human movement presents a jaw-dropping and strangely relaxed vision of limits of the human body.

From experimentsinmotion:


The digital stroboscopic image of a dancer above and the still from the video “Seaweed” by Tell No One both capture individual stages of movement in a single frame. Andy Warhol’s ‘Dance Diagram Series’ (1962) and the ‘Treatise On Quadrille Dancing’ (1819) notate the same complexity in a format that begins to approach something an architect might understand. Capturing the dance of car circulation, Kahn’s Traffic Study for Philadelphia could just as easily orchestrate a massive urban scaled ballet.

Tell No One’s video Seaweed above layers and partially freezes simple movements to create a moving sculpture that is both a structure and a dance.
Jordan Clark’s lo-fi experimental video on human movement presents a jaw-dropping and strangely relaxed vision of limits of the human body.

From experimentsinmotion:


The digital stroboscopic image of a dancer above and the still from the video “Seaweed” by Tell No One both capture individual stages of movement in a single frame. Andy Warhol’s ‘Dance Diagram Series’ (1962) and the ‘Treatise On Quadrille Dancing’ (1819) notate the same complexity in a format that begins to approach something an architect might understand. Capturing the dance of car circulation, Kahn’s Traffic Study for Philadelphia could just as easily orchestrate a massive urban scaled ballet.

Tell No One’s video Seaweed above layers and partially freezes simple movements to create a moving sculpture that is both a structure and a dance.
Jordan Clark’s lo-fi experimental video on human movement presents a jaw-dropping and strangely relaxed vision of limits of the human body.

From experimentsinmotion:


The digital stroboscopic image of a dancer above and the still from the video “Seaweed” by Tell No One both capture individual stages of movement in a single frame. Andy Warhol’s ‘Dance Diagram Series’ (1962) and the ‘Treatise On Quadrille Dancing’ (1819) notate the same complexity in a format that begins to approach something an architect might understand. Capturing the dance of car circulation, Kahn’s Traffic Study for Philadelphia could just as easily orchestrate a massive urban scaled ballet.

Tell No One’s video Seaweed above layers and partially freezes simple movements to create a moving sculpture that is both a structure and a dance.
Jordan Clark’s lo-fi experimental video on human movement presents a jaw-dropping and strangely relaxed vision of limits of the human body.

From experimentsinmotion:

The digital stroboscopic image of a dancer above and the still from the video “Seaweed” by Tell No One both capture individual stages of movement in a single frame. Andy Warhol’s ‘Dance Diagram Series’ (1962) and the ‘Treatise On Quadrille Dancing’ (1819) notate the same complexity in a format that begins to approach something an architect might understand. Capturing the dance of car circulation, Kahn’s Traffic Study for Philadelphia could just as easily orchestrate a massive urban scaled ballet.

Tell No One’s video Seaweed above layers and partially freezes simple movements to create a moving sculpture that is both a structure and a dance.

Jordan Clark’s lo-fi experimental video on human movement presents a jaw-dropping and strangely relaxed vision of limits of the human body.

(via futurepredictor)

futurepredictor:

The Secret History of Everyday Architecture
futurepredictor:

The Secret History of Everyday Architecture
futurepredictor:

The Secret History of Everyday Architecture

From experimentsinmotion

Aircondition (2006) by Oliver Laric uses video processing tools to exhaustion displaying every frame of the sequence to expose intricate patterns of an otherwise ridiculous dance.

Martin Hiploltsteiner explores a similar technique through a series of studies that array film stills giving even simple motions complex three dimensional implications. His animation for the song Videotape by Radiohead inverts the concept of exposing the hidden complexity of motion and instead gives everyday architectural elements the ability to move, float and express the ennui of generic parking garage.

Both by exposing the hidden forms of motion and animating the inanimate, Laric and Hilpoltsteiner imagine impossible spaces where motion can be seen as a space. Harold Edgerton’s ‘Tennis Serve’ (1949)  was able to capture the stages of motion but it does not explore three dimensional space in the same way as its contemporary descendants.

experimentsinmotion:

Jacques-Henri Lartigue’s iconic photograph of a speeding automobile race is a benchmark of our fascination with the tension between the still image and motion. As new imaging technologies are developed, the phenomenon and appeal of motion distortion continues - in this case caused by the rolling shutter used in iphones. Images of disembodied airplane propellers and leaning landscapes have even inspired their own flickr gallery.

The split-scan video above animates everyday motion with mind warping technique that simulates the effects of a rolling shutter.

Leaning forward into the blast of an airplane propeller hidden beyond  the frame, Lartigue’s image exposes the hidden forces of new technology  and embraces motion as an ideal.

A photograph of Lartigue’s sister floating through the air oblivious to the forces of gravity resonates with the work of Denis Darzacq

Below, the most recent entry into the world of motion memes - floating babies. Rachel Hulin’s series of photos of her baby (named Henry) drifting through a series of scenarios brings motion to a standstill.

experimentsinmotion:

Jacques-Henri Lartigue’s iconic photograph of a speeding automobile race is a benchmark of our fascination with the tension between the still image and motion. As new imaging technologies are developed, the phenomenon and appeal of motion distortion continues - in this case caused by the rolling shutter used in iphones. Images of disembodied airplane propellers and leaning landscapes have even inspired their own flickr gallery.

The split-scan video above animates everyday motion with mind warping technique that simulates the effects of a rolling shutter.

Leaning forward into the blast of an airplane propeller hidden beyond  the frame, Lartigue’s image exposes the hidden forces of new technology  and embraces motion as an ideal.

A photograph of Lartigue’s sister floating through the air oblivious to the forces of gravity resonates with the work of Denis Darzacq

Below, the most recent entry into the world of motion memes - floating babies. Rachel Hulin’s series of photos of her baby (named Henry) drifting through a series of scenarios brings motion to a standstill.

experimentsinmotion:

Jacques-Henri Lartigue’s iconic photograph of a speeding automobile race is a benchmark of our fascination with the tension between the still image and motion. As new imaging technologies are developed, the phenomenon and appeal of motion distortion continues - in this case caused by the rolling shutter used in iphones. Images of disembodied airplane propellers and leaning landscapes have even inspired their own flickr gallery.

The split-scan video above animates everyday motion with mind warping technique that simulates the effects of a rolling shutter.

Leaning forward into the blast of an airplane propeller hidden beyond  the frame, Lartigue’s image exposes the hidden forces of new technology  and embraces motion as an ideal.

A photograph of Lartigue’s sister floating through the air oblivious to the forces of gravity resonates with the work of Denis Darzacq

Below, the most recent entry into the world of motion memes - floating babies. Rachel Hulin’s series of photos of her baby (named Henry) drifting through a series of scenarios brings motion to a standstill.

experimentsinmotion:

Jacques-Henri Lartigue’s iconic photograph of a speeding automobile race is a benchmark of our fascination with the tension between the still image and motion. As new imaging technologies are developed, the phenomenon and appeal of motion distortion continues - in this case caused by the rolling shutter used in iphones. Images of disembodied airplane propellers and leaning landscapes have even inspired their own flickr gallery.

The split-scan video above animates everyday motion with mind warping technique that simulates the effects of a rolling shutter.

Leaning forward into the blast of an airplane propeller hidden beyond  the frame, Lartigue’s image exposes the hidden forces of new technology  and embraces motion as an ideal.

A photograph of Lartigue’s sister floating through the air oblivious to the forces of gravity resonates with the work of Denis Darzacq

Below, the most recent entry into the world of motion memes - floating babies. Rachel Hulin’s series of photos of her baby (named Henry) drifting through a series of scenarios brings motion to a standstill.

experimentsinmotion:

Jacques-Henri Lartigue’s iconic photograph of a speeding automobile race is a benchmark of our fascination with the tension between the still image and motion. As new imaging technologies are developed, the phenomenon and appeal of motion distortion continues - in this case caused by the rolling shutter used in iphones. Images of disembodied airplane propellers and leaning landscapes have even inspired their own flickr gallery.

The split-scan video above animates everyday motion with mind warping technique that simulates the effects of a rolling shutter.

Leaning forward into the blast of an airplane propeller hidden beyond the frame, Lartigue’s image exposes the hidden forces of new technology and embraces motion as an ideal.

A photograph of Lartigue’s sister floating through the air oblivious to the forces of gravity resonates with the work of Denis Darzacq

Below, the most recent entry into the world of motion memes - floating babies. Rachel Hulin’s series of photos of her baby (named Henry) drifting through a series of scenarios brings motion to a standstill.

Modern Tide: Midcentury Architecture on Long Island. Modern Tide: Midcentury Architecture on Long Island. Modern Tide: Midcentury Architecture on Long Island. Modern Tide: Midcentury Architecture on Long Island.
Revealing the hidden power of motion:

Loie Fuller, ‘Futurist Dance’ (1902) 
Frank and Lillian Gilbreth, ‘Motion Study’ (1913) 

source:: experimentsinmotion Revealing the hidden power of motion:

Loie Fuller, ‘Futurist Dance’ (1902) 
Frank and Lillian Gilbreth, ‘Motion Study’ (1913) 

source:: experimentsinmotion
Mobile architecture from the cityofmobileservices blog:

Garth Priber posted this incredible images from the 1960s, showing Spanish architect Emilio Pérez  Piñero with a working model of his mobile pantographic theater

Mobile architecture from the cityofmobileservices blog:

Garth Priber posted this incredible images from the 1960s, showing Spanish architect Emilio Pérez Piñero with a working model of his mobile pantographic theater

(Source: garthpriber-eim, via cityofmobileservices)

If “Napoleonland” finds the funding it needs, then it could become an attraction on par with Euro Disney.